Heck.house: an interview with Paula Novelle

The Heck.house is one of our favorite places in DeKalb County! We're excited to install a meadow at the median right across from Heck, which will nicely compliment their edible landscaping all over the venue.

We wanted to know more about Heck.house and the wonderful person who runs it, Paula Novelle, so we sent Paula some questions via email and she was kind enough to send us back these lovely answers.



RD: The Heck.house is a magical place. What was the inspiration for Heck.house?


PN: A patchwork quilt. Often a quilt is made out of diverse materials that are patched together artistically, and oftentimes those materials are reused and repurposed. Quilts are also multi-layers with multiple functions. They provide not only warmth and comfort, but also creative artistic expression and visual history. Heck is an old, small house that has been repurposed into an artistic venue for interactive inclusive events, such as workshops, music events, shows and art events. Heck is always in-progress of being “arted-up” into a major patchwork or a hodgepodge of our creative and eclectic community.


See the work we're doing for Heck.house.


RD: You have installed plants and gardens all around Heck.house - why is growing food important to you?


PN: Simply to include the beauty of gardening arts and culinary arts to our expressive artistic collection. The current trend is to eat more fresh, organic foods, and the local interest in gardening and plant related workshops has grown considerably. The side-front of Heck is becoming an outdoor dining room with a 12-foot table that is a repurposed bowling lane sitting on radiators. We have a “kitchen garden” in the corner that has an old fridge and stove used as planters for herbs, vegetables, and other plants. You can simply snip off some mint, lavender or chamomile and add it to your tea or mixed drink. Possibly chop up some organic tomatoes and peppers for your cooking class.


RD: What is your favorite part of living in DeKalb County?


PN: Most definitely the people. DeKalb County is diverse, progressive and growing. I’m a little in awe of how much DeKalb has urbanized with mixed-use developments, walkability and/or bike-friendly accommodations and international cultural enrichment. Roots Down is a part of that growth that continues to amaze me by creating functional landscaping that improves as well as beautifies our environment.



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